Indexing: Episodes 1-4

In my copy of Indexing, the first four episodes cover pages 1 – 126 (assuming I correctly understood what an episode is). Even though this is a considerable chunk of reading, I’m still uncertain which character I like the most.

That said, I do like the story. The concept is refreshing and intriguing, and I definitely like the interactions between the characters. However, I’m less sold on the characters as individuals – Sloane’s angst and darkness were amusing at first but were becoming more predictable until the recent plot twist. Henry is also interesting but we spend so much time in her head, so to speak, that I am almost more curious about some of the characters we have seen less of.

I like what we’ve seen of Jeff and Andy so far, and I’m curious to read more about Demi, too. I think Demi’s story might be the most interesting to me at the moment – her entrance to the fairytale world wasn’t too far off from the start of the story, so as the reader I can connect to her newness to the team. For this reason, I find it easy to sympathize with her – she has been plucked out of her normal life into the ATI, just like we as readers have been dropped into the world of the story. Even though we don’t read as much about Demi as we do some of the other characters, I think she might be my favorite so far.

I also really like some of the minor characters in the story! I have to wonder if the tensions with the deputy director will ever amount to any problems with the story – he definitely seems like someone the team could unite against. I also thought that Birdie’s character was quite adorable so far and I hope that we get to see more of her in the rest of the story.

Journal Entry: Hans Christian Andersen

I really enjoyed reading about Hans Christian Andersen’s life. It’s inspiring that Hans Christian Andersen was able to achieve so much given his humble beginnings – I think it’s especially admirable how hard he worked and that he never gave up on his dreams despite the obstacles and struggles.

I also found it interesting that the biography tied some of the stories into Hans’s life. It’s a little bit heartbreaking though to discover that The Little Mermaid’s lack of complete acceptance was based on the author’s life – however, I think this may be one of the aspects that adds realism to Andersen’s fairy tales. After all, the real world and the people in it are not always kind or accepting.

It’s also sad that Andersen was never able to fully fit into the Collin family and upper-class society. This isn’t really surprising, but I can certainly sympathize with Andersen – despite his brilliance, he was never ‘good enough’ to be fully accepted by elite society and I imagine that wasn’t easy for him.

I also particularly liked reading about the reception that Andersen’s tales received in his lifetime. Today, we mainly know them as classics, so it was really interesting to discover what readers thought of them initially, as well as to learn about Andersen’s interactions with other writers of the time. I thought it was especially relevant to our class that Hans Christian Andersen became friendly with the Grimm Brothers and their folklore group. I can’t help but wonder what such a group might have talked about, or if these writers may have directly influenced each other somehow.